Mastering Mentoring Series Part Two: Traditional Versus Emerging Models

May 19, 2021

Mentoring is characterized by the bidirectional exchange of knowledge and skills to promote professional growth and personal gratification. Through meaningful partnerships in learning, Muslim mental health professionals are well equipped to support students, trainees, young professionals and peers. This article provides an overview of Mentorship, Coaching, and Supervision as conceptual learning frameworks supported by evidence-based literature.

Mastering Mentoring Series Part 1: Back to Basics

May 19, 2021

A successful mentorship is a partnership in learning – individuals committed to helping one another become fuller versions of themselves. It is a joint venture of sharing responsibility for learning. Good intentions, however, are not enough. Effective mentoring takes time; and in the mentor relationship, time is currency. Mentors donate time – time that could be used to pursue one’s own career goals or to install a new backsplash- to someone else’s career development. Incorporating mentor-specific time management techniques, aligning expectations, and clarifying boundaries gives mentors the ability and availability to contribute to the mentoring partnership in a meaningful way. Consistency, efficiency, and mutual benefit is the best way to ensure the mentorship enjoys a healthy, purposeful existence.

Post-Conference Engagement: How to Make the Most of your Conference Experience

May 10, 2021

The Annual Muslim Mental Health Conference provides a space for Muslim mental health professionals and students, both domestic and international, to cultivate compassion and a sense of community. Upon conclusion of the closing remarks, we feel emotionally, spiritually and intellectually inspired, thankful, and optimistic. Here are tangible ways to help you direct that spirited post-conference energy.

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Suicide Postvention – Crisis Response Summary

May 10, 2021

Suicide is a human condition. As such, Muslims are not immune to mental health challenges, mental illness, and suicidal ideation. The Institute for Muslim Mental Health coordinated and hosted an emergency Meet the Expert Pro-Series webinar on Thursday, April 8th 2021 in response to a mental health crisis in the Muslim community. The Pro-series webinars are geared towards Muslim mental health practitioners and community faith leaders. This article summarizes the key learning points of Dr. Rania Awaad’s webinar presentation. 

13th Annual Muslim Mental Health Conference 2021

March 13, 2021

Coping with COVID: Best practices for mental health professionals during the pandemic.

August 10, 2020

Who could have imagined that, a few short months into 2020, the world would come to a complete standstill? Businesses have closed down, schools are empty, but some of our homes are possibly more full than they have been in a long time. In addition to the many stressors faced by all people as a result of the quarantine, Muslims have faced additional challenges that are unique to them. As Muslim health care professionals, it is important to understand how to cope with these challenges during these unique times, as well as how to guide those seeking our help.