13th Annual Muslim Mental Health Conference 2021

March 13, 2021

Coping with COVID: Best practices for mental health professionals during the pandemic.

August 10, 2020

Who could have imagined that, a few short months into 2020, the world would come to a complete standstill? Businesses have closed down, schools are empty, but some of our homes are possibly more full than they have been in a long time. In addition to the many stressors faced by all people as a result of the quarantine, Muslims have faced additional challenges that are unique to them. As Muslim health care professionals, it is important to understand how to cope with these challenges during these unique times, as well as how to guide those seeking our help.

Telehealth and COVID-19: The Dos and Don’ts

June 28, 2020

With the COVID-19 pandemic catching the world by surprise, physicians and other healthcare providers have had to find ways to continue providing patients with treatment, while also keeping patients safe from possible infection. This spans physical and mental health treatment providers and facilities. Furthermore, studies have shown American Muslims often do not seek mental health services due to stigma and discomfort with sharing their stories to “strangers”.  Telehealth has become ever more important to help American Muslims and the general population access services.

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Call for Papers

April 12, 2017

The Journal of Muslim Mental Health is a much-needed resource for professionals seeking to identify and explore the mental health care needs of Muslims in all areas of the world.

I Am Your Psychiatrist, Not Your Sheikh

April 11, 2017

Let’s face it, being a Muslim mental health professional isn’t always easy. We often times deal with stigma from all around – from within the community, from society and from in the masjid. We may share a common desire to provide care, healing and hope to the mentally ill members  of our very own Muslim communities. Some of us are often driven by rescue fantasies — but when do such subconscious drives blur boundaries? While we embark on this professional path with optimism, bright eyes and a sense of idealism, as we start to see patients of similar backgrounds, we may experience  unexpected feelings and challenges. This can raise our anxiety about caring for Muslim clients and patients, especially for early career psychologists, therapists and psychiatrists. And so it is ironic that the very reason we ventured into this field can become an area of anxiety and consternation. And while Muslim  clients oftentimes prefer practitioners of similar backgrounds, we know Muslims are not a monolith and represent a wide range of ethnicities, races and degrees of acculturation. How do we deal with situations when we are not the perfect fit as our clients desire?

Syria’s Children: Mental Health Implications

March 13, 2017

The Syrian crisis has entered its seventh year. The country that once birthed the cradle of civilization is destroyed to a great extent and will likely never be the same. 13.5 million Syrians are in need of humanitarian aid – 5.8 million of which are children. Meanwhile, more than half a million Syrians have been killed, and millions (5 million, as reported by UNHCR this week) more have been displaced around the world since the beginning of one of the most devastating and protracted conflicts of our time.