APRIL 13-14, 2017  300 M.A.C. Avenue, East Lansing MI 48823 The Annual Muslim Mental Health Conference brings together faith leaders, health care providers, and researchers to examine topics related to mental health across the American Muslim community.  Participants can expect to hear relevant speeches by keynote speakers, scholarly research presentations, and panel discussions. 2017 Muslim Mental…

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The Journal of Muslim Mental Health is a much-needed resource for professionals seeking to identify and explore the mental health care needs of Muslims in all areas of the world.

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Let’s face it, being a Muslim mental health professional isn’t always easy. We often times deal with stigma from all around – from within the community, from society and from in the masjid. We may share a common desire to provide care, healing and hope to the mentally ill members  of our very own Muslim communities. Some of us are often driven by rescue fantasies — but when do such subconscious drives blur boundaries? While we embark on this professional path with optimism, bright eyes and a sense of idealism, as we start to see patients of similar backgrounds, we may experience  unexpected feelings and challenges. This can raise our anxiety about caring for Muslim clients and patients, especially for early career psychologists, therapists and psychiatrists. And so it is ironic that the very reason we ventured into this field can become an area of anxiety and consternation. And while Muslim  clients oftentimes prefer practitioners of similar backgrounds, we know Muslims are not a monolith and represent a wide range of ethnicities, races and degrees of acculturation. How do we deal with situations when we are not the perfect fit as our clients desire?

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